You Can Get Pregnant Over 40 Naturally

You Can Get Pregnant Over 40 Naturally
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Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Smoking: It's Not Just Cigarettes That Can Lead To Miscarriage


It's not just cigarettes that can lead to a multitude of problems in pregnancy, smoking marijuana can also lead to miscarriage. I am assuming most women who want to get pregnant are not involved with illegal drugs, but according to the article below, marijuana is the most widely used illegal drug among women of reproductive age. Read more:

Marijuana Use Causes Early Pregnancy Failure (www.sciencedaily.com)

Marijuana, the most widely used illegal drug among women of reproductive age, binds to 2 receptors -- cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1, CB2) -- which are found in the brain and other organs including sperm, eggs, and newly formed embryos. Normally, these 2 receptors are activated by the naturally occurring signaling molecule anandamide. Anandamide formation by the enzyme NAPE-PLD is carefully balanced with its degradation by the enzyme FAAH, resulting in a finely tuned local "anandamide tone" in embryos and the oviduct. This balance is required for normal embryonic development, transport along the oviduct, implantation in the uterus, and full-term pregnancy.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

What Is CVS and What Are The Risks?

My prenatal screening pretty much consisted of an amniocentesis at 15 weeks. However there is another test called CVS or Chorionic Villus Sampling. Here is an article that explains what it is, what it screens for, and the risks:

Patient information: Chorionic villus sampling
Alessandro Ghidini, MD
Rodney McLaren, MD
(patients.uptodate.com)


A pregnant woman may consider CVS testing if:

She desires genetic testing for fetal chromosome anomalies (however, because CVS entails some risk of pregnancy loss, most women consider CVS if the risk of a fetal genetic disease, like Down syndrome, outweigh the risks of the procedure)
There is a close family or previous pregnancy history of a genetic disorder
She has had an abnormal screening test result during her first trimester, raising questions about whether the fetus has Down syndrome (See "Patient information: First trimester and integrated screening for Down syndrome").
Genetic disorders that can be diagnosed from DNA analysis can be determined with CVS or amniocentesis. Neural tube defects in the fetus cannot be detected by CVS...
COMPLICATIONS — The most serious complications from CVS are fetal damage and miscarriage. CVS does not affect the risk of stillbirth or infant death.

Miscarriage — Studies have shown that CVS increases a woman's risk of miscarriage. For every 100 women who undergo CVS, approximately one woman will have a miscarriage as a result of the procedure. The risk of CVS is higher than that of amniocentesis, after which approximately one in 200 women will have a miscarriage related to the procedure.

There appears to be an even higher risk of miscarriage with the transcervical CVS technique compared to the transabominal technique. Other factors that further increase the risk of CVS include having the procedure three or more times and having a fetus that is smaller than normal for their age. The physician's skill and experience also play an important role.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Drinking Alcohol In Pregnancy: Even A Little Dangerous


Most women know to avoid alcohol in pregnancy, but many women wonder about having just "a little bit". The following article from The March Of Dimes addresses the dangers of alcohol in pregnancy even in small amounts:


Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy (www.marchofdimes.com)


From the article:

Although many women are aware that heavy drinking during pregnancy can cause birth defects, many do not realize that moderate—or even light—drinking also may harm the fetus.
In fact, no level of alcohol use during pregnancy has been proven safe. Therefore, the March of Dimes recommends that pregnant women do not drink any alcohol—including beer, wine, wine coolers and hard liquor—throughout their pregnancy and while nursing. In addition, because women often do not know they are pregnant for a few months, women who may be pregnant or those who are attempting to become pregnant should abstain from drinking alcoholic beverages.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Is The Food You're Eating Safe During Pregnancy?



I was pretty careful about what I ate during pregnancy, but I did occasionally eat out. There are some foods you should watch out for since they may harbor certain organisms which could lead to miscarriage if you're infected:

Food Safety During Pregnancy

From the article:

"Examples of pathogens of special concern to pregnant women are Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii, Brucella species, Salmonella species and Campylobacter jejuni. Certain organisms can cross the placenta and increase the fetus’s risk of becoming infected. Infection can result in miscarriage, stillbirth, premature labor or severe complications for the baby. Certain organisms, including Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii, Salmonella typhi and Campylobacter jejuni, can have adverse consequences for the fetus if they cross the placenta."

If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, I urge you to read the entire article to learn how to protect yourself from these infections.

Thursday, October 08, 2009

Do Miscarried Souls Return?



I've talked to a number of women who've experienced miscarriage or recurrent miscarriage. When these women do succeed in having a baby, many wonder if one of their miscarried baby's souls "came back" into their baby.

Obviously my official answer to this is "I don't know". All I can give you is my experience and my opinion. Before my daughter was born, while I was pregnant with her, she moved around like crazy. I would feel her kick more than 40 times in one hour. After she was born she was and still is VERY active and has a real zest for life. She wants to participate in everything and she isn't one that needs a lot of reassurance or cuddling (I wish she liked to cuddle more). I think one reason she picked me as her mother (and I think she did pick me) is she knew that I had the maturity and patience to deal with her strong personality. I frequently joke around and say "Any baby that can survive in my uterus must be pretty strong willed".

So in answer to whether or not one of my six miscarried babies came back as my daughter, I would have to say no. I think my daughter held on so tight there's no way I could have ever lost her pregnancy. I'm not saying that my babies who miscarried didn't have the will to live (and I try not to blame myself for not being able to give them life), it's just that my "gut" feeling is that they were all different souls.

I often wonder where they are and who they are. Maybe we'll all meet again someday.

Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Smoking Correlation With Infant Death

Most women I've known who are trying to get pregnant or who have suffered one or more miscarriages wouldn't dream of smoking (at least during pregnancy), however it's worth posting this article about how there actually is a correlation between smoking in pregnancy and infant death (as well as low birthweight and premature babies). I recall, years ago, knowing a woman I worked with (a nurse if you can believe it) who went through IVF, got pregnant with twins, and smoked throughout her pregnancy! Her poor little babies were born premature and my last memory is of those tiny little babies in their stroller with tubes of oxygen all around. I feel a pang of anger and sadness everytime I think about it.

Here is an article from nytimes.com about a study done on the dangers of smoking:

5,600 Infant Deaths Tied to Mothers' Smoking

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